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Full text of "Mary Baldwin"

^aldwiti 




The Fourth B - Broman 



By Nancy Draper 



Miss Diaper is one of Dr. Broman's former students. After graduating from 
Mary Baldwin in 1951, she went on to earn her Master of Music degree from 
the Eastman School of Music. Miss Draper also studied at the Staatlich Hochshule 
for Music and Theater in Hanover, Germany, and in 1964 was awarded a soloist's 
diploma in piano from this institution. In addition, she has done summer study 
in Colorado and in New York. Presently she is Associate Professor of Music at 
Colby Junior College in New London, New Hampshire. 



Our alma mater made a wise and for- 
tunate choice in appointing Dr. Carl 
W. Broman, a person of unusual capa- 
bilities, as chairman of the music de- 
partment in 1935, upon the retirement 
of Dr. Wilmar Robert Schmidt. 

Throughout its history, the college 
has recognized and encouraged ex- 
cellence in education and the building 
of ideals and character in the indivi- 
dual. These objectives have been ably 
implemented by Dr. Broman through- 
out his 39 years of loyal and dedicated 
service. 

Some musicians excell as perform- 
ers; others excell as educators. Dr. 
Broman is unique in having achieved 
success in both categories. Before leav- 
ing his native Chicago, he won several 
awards and contests, one of which 
resulted in his performing with the 
Chicago Symphony Orchestra. He re- 
ceived a scholarship to attend the 
famed Juilliard School of Music, in the 
piano classes of both Josef and Rosina 
Lhevinne, world-renowned artist-teach- 
ers. With very few exceptions, every 
pianist of importance today has studied 
with Madame Lhevinne, the grande 
dame of piano teachers. "I'm not plan- 
ning to emulate her!" Dr. Broman re- 
marked recently when commenting on 
her teaching career, for she is still ac- 
tive at the age of 94! 

For most performers who receive 
recognition, honors are limited to one 
area of specialty. Here again, Dr. 
Broman is remarkable. He received 
a National Federation of Music Clubs 
award in organ. He conducted the 
Lutheran Bach Society of New York 
for five years, and presented perform- 
ances in Town Hall and various 
churches in New York City. In fact, 
during Dr. Broman's early years at 



Mary Baldwin, he was in charge of 
all the choral work and directed the 
glee club at Hampden-Sydney College 
with numerous performances, includ- 
ing some with the Harvard Orchestra. 

Further honors include member- 
ship in Phi Gamma Delta fraternity 
and in The Pierian Sodality of 1808 
of Harvard University, the oldest ac- 
tive musical organization in America. 
Only seven honorary members had 
been admitted to this organization in 
its long history prior to Dr. Broman's 
election. 

In addition to studies at Juilliard. 
Dr. Broman's educational background 
includes degrees from the University 
of Chicago, the American Conserva- 
tory of Music, Columbia University, 
and an honorary dotorate from Hamp- 
den-Sydney College. Throughout his 
years in Staunton, he has become well 
known for his achievements as pianist, 
organist, and conductor. Even when 
his teaching career was interrupted for 
three years of service with the U. S. 
Army, Captain Broman, as Special 
Services officer at Camp Shanks, N.Y., 
utilized his talents in arranging out- 
standing musical performances for the 
troops about to embark overseas. 

As a musician. Dr. Broman's qualif- 
ications and experiences are notable. 
Equally impressive is his versatility in 
the field of education. It is rare to 
find a teacher who is successful in so 
many areas — instrumental and choral 
music, literature, theory, and composi- 
tion. I recall, from my student days 
at Mary Baldwin, that we music majors 
spoke of the four B's memorable as 
musicians: Bach, Beethoven, Brahms, 
and Broman. 

But knowledge and educational 
background and experience alone do 



not make the great teacher. What is 
it. then, that has won Dr. Broman 
such high esteem throughout the years 
among so many people, colleagues as 
well as students? Much of it has to do 
with traits of personality and character. 

1 have never known a person more 
dedicated to his art and profession. 
He loves to teach — to train and develop 
the skills, minds, and character of his 
students. In his wisdom. Dr. Broman 
guides with the utmost patience, under- 
standing, kindness, and compassion, 
using his gift for discerning the 
strengths and weaknesses of each indi- 
vidual. College students of all genera- 
tions have sought to know themselves 
better, to learn to recognize and come 
to terms with their own identities; Dr. 
Broman has helped many to achieve 
this goal. 

He has fond memories of graduates 
whom he has taught in past years; yet 
he says of today's students, "I think 
this is a very good generation." The 
numbers of alumnae who have studied 
with him and successfully completed 
graduate training at some of the lead- 
ing universities in this country and 
abroad attest to his success as an edu- 
cator. However, his influence is by no 
means limited to those who have pur- 
sued careers in music. I know other 
students whose lives have been deeply 
touched by the stimulus and inspira- 
tion that he has provided. For all, the 
dedicatory inscription for the Blue- 
stocking of 1958 still holds true: "He 
is an unselfish musician who has not 
hidden his light under a bushel, but 
who has used his talent as an imple- 
mein with which to guide us in our 
search for the beautiful." 

Dr. Broman was never too busy to 
help a deserving student, a remarkable 
trait when one considers his heavy 
teaching schedule and other college- 
community activities. He was a true 
friend and counselor, an excellent 
faculty adviser who took a sincere in- 
terest in his students. He encouraged 
or criticized as deserved. Undoubted- 
ly this had much to do with the trust 
and confidence placed upon his judg- 
ment. 




Dr. Broman's vitality as an educator 
never waned. He was constantly read- 
ing, attending workshops, and partici- 
pating actively in leading musical or- 
ganizations throughout the country. 
In addition, he served as organist and 
choirmaster at Trinity Episcopal 
Church in Staunton, chairman of the 
Music Commission for the Episcopal 
Diocese of Southwestern Virginia, and 
chairman of the board of the King 
Series. 

Dr. Broman's expectations are high 
and there are times when his students 
must work very hard, but there are 
also times when his sense of humor 
lightens the day. Then too, there are 
times of much fun, enhanced by his 
good judgment in the choice of a wife! 
Countless students over the years have 
remarked about the loveable warmth 
of personality of Mrs. Broman, her 
charm and her gracious hospitality. 
What good times we have enjoyed in 
their home for receptions and dinner 
parties! 

The Broman children have likewise 
succeeded in careers where importance 
of the individual is stressed. Mary, 
employed as instructor of French and 
resident counselor at Mary Baldwin 
the year following her graduation, is 
now vocational evaluator at the Wood- 
row Wilson Rehabilitation Center. 
John is executive director of Tinker 
Mountain Workshop, a rehabilitation 
facility in Botetourt County, Virginia. 

Dr. Broman says that his retire- 
ment plans are still indefinite. He con- 
tinually thinks of projects that seem 
exciting. Now that he has time to 
devote to new, worthwhile endeavors, 
there is no doubt that he will find new. 
rewarding experiences. 

It is the Dr. Bromans of this world 
who create and maintain the atmos- 
phere of understanding and learning 
that is Mary Baldwin. 



IN THIS ISSUE 

3 The Place, the People — 
Changing, Unchanging 
by Barbara Allan Hite '58 
with help from Bette Allan Collins '61 

8 The Fourth B — Broman 
by Nancy Draper '5 1 

1 Vega, story of joie de vivre 
by Betty Carr 
Director of Food Services 

12 Back When Cokes Were A Nickel . . . 
by Jann Malone '72 



Editor: Dolores Lescure • Vol. XXII, No. 3, May 1974. 

Issued 7 times a year, February, April, May, June, Sep- 
tember, October and December by Mary Baldwin Col- 
lege, Box 2445, Staunton, Virginia 24401. Second Class 
postage paid at Staunton, Virginia 24401, and at addi- 
tional mailing offices. 




Everybody joins in square-dancing after a Saturday night performance 



Relaxing at "The Farm" 



'The Pond" in performance 














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The Place, the People - Changing, Unchanging 



By Barbara Allan Hue with help from Bette Allan Collins 



My memories of the place — and the people — go back a 
long time. First there was the Oak Grove Theater, started 
in 1954 by a group of Stauntonians under the direction of 
Mary Baldwin's drama professor. Dr. Fletcher Collins, Jr. 

Dr. Collins and his wife, Margaret, invited six Mary 
Baldwin students to live with them in their farmhouse just 
outside Staunton near Verona, Va. We girls helped with 
productions in the outdoor theater located atop one of the 
hills on the 100 acres surrounding the house. This was the 
beginning. (The Oak Grove opens its 21st season this 
summer.) 

But during these same years, while summer theater activi- 
ties flourished and as actors and technicians from Waynes- 
boro and Harrisonburg joined Stauntonians, there developed 
another nucleus of people who were specifically interested 
in the plays Margaret Collins was writing. 

In any case, we drew together. The atmosphere was 
charged. We decided to do entirely new things. That was 
the commitment. And this group, expanded, became "Thea- 
ter Wagon" in 1967. And Theater Wagon, a branch of the 
Oak Grove Theater, grew as a group of actors, writers and 
technicians possessed of a special excitement and dedication. 

It is this special feeling that most likely led to the Sum- 
mer Festival get-togethers. Theater Wagon, in contrast to 
the Oak Grove Theater, began as a touring group and has 
played everywhere from Woodrow Wilson's Birthplace in 
Staunton to the Greenwich Muse Theater in New York 
City. The group has received four grants from the Virginia 
Commission for the Arts for its role in encouraging new 
playwrights and producing new plays in Virginia. 



(Editor's Note: Twenty members of Theater Wagon will 
travel to Europe this summer to present plays at the Edin- 
burgh Festival Fringe in Scotland. They also will stage a 
miracle play written by Benedictine monks in the 12th 
century, and transcribed and researched by Dr. Collins. 
The cast will present this at the abbey St. Benoit de Fleury, 
Loire Valley, in central France, where the play originated.) 

There are always six to eight plays in Theater Wagon's 
active repertory; members may play one part in a show 
one year and another part in the same show the next year. 
Or they may do the same role for five years while other 
cast members come and go. Being so spread out and en- 
compassing more active members and interested supporters 
in scattered places year after year, it seemed natural to 
establish some sort of focal moment in a key place to allow 
everyone to be together at once, to be "recharged" so to 
speak. 

For the past three years, then, Theater Wagon has been 
holding a weekend festival of new plays in August at the 
Oak Grove Farm and Theater. Some people gather at The 
Farm for the week before and rehearse a new show to 
perform on one of the festival nights. Some bring a show 
and cast already rehearsed and arrive with children and 
dogs at the last minute. Others combine these two methods, 
working in new cast members during the last few days — 
despite children and dogs! 

I've never been to one of those huge, old-fashioned family 
reunions, but the atmosphere at this festival must be like 
that — only heightened by the extra stimulation of multi- 
creations in progress. 



Barbara A llan Hite '58 



Bette Allan Collins '61 





FESTIVAL WEEKEND 73 



Festival Weekend I arrived Thursday with my two young- 
est: Jon. 6, and Meg, 3. Coming down the lane, the ruts 
of which have been worked and reworked so much through 
the years that one is always challenged to find the smooth- 
est crossing and recrossing, Jon expressed his gratitude 
that the cows were still here. '"It's just the same," he said. 
Yep. In many ways; in most ways. The children feel as 
much the continuity of this place as the adults; and this 
year Jon and Chris, my oldest son, 11, had parts in the 
play my husband, a friend and I were doing. 

As we pulled in we spoke to one dog whose nose was 
stuffed out of a partially-closed car window. It's not enough 
juggling around 42 overnight human guests, figuring who's 
camping out where, who's sleeping inside where and in 
relation to whom, who's arriving and leaving when and 
where, who's for dinner which days. The Collins also 
take into consideration the habits and personalities of the 
guests' dogs: which will run free when, which will eat 
where when, which bark the most during performances, 
and so on. So far, happily, no one has brought a cat! 

Inside the farmhouse we are met by three babysitters. Ah. 
Child security. That's nice. And by the refrigerator we 
find Terry Koogler Southerington — looking for bottles. 
Terry is working on a master's in math and teaching at 
Madison College in Harrisonburg, Va. What has a math 
major to do in the theater? "The thing about Theater 
Wagon is it's loose. You can try things. Without drama 
(it's such a break), I'd get so tired of math I'd just want 
to throw it all away!" Today, instead, she's pulling bottles 
for stage props from trash cans in the mudroom. I checked 
with Terry to see where I was supposed to be. 

There are three main rehearsal areas: the large Oak 
Grove stage is available when the summer season ends; a 
wagon shed out back at The Farm has been redesigned 
and rigged with theater lights; and there's a large rehearsal 
room in at The Oaks, the Collins' 23-room Victorian house 
in Staunton. 

This year the Festival schedule included Margaret's play, 
"The Pond," on Friday night; my one-act "Ready or Not" 
and Margaret's sister, Kay Bart's "Doug's Play" on Satur- 
day night to be followed by music and square-dancing; 
Celia Flow Eller's Raggedy Ann group from Boston with 
"A Mother and Child Reunion" Sunday afternoon; and 
Jeannie Lee's full-length play, "Mushrooms and How They 
Grow," in reading on Sunday night. All had to be sched- 
uled for rehearsals and babysitters and last-minute adjust- 
ments. 

* * * 

The Farm? The house? The high pasture? The theater 
itself? Well, nothing is ever fully explained, summarized 
by its name. But, since I was a freshman at MBC, acting 
in summer shows at the Oak Grove, these words, "The 
Farm," have explained more than I know to say of the 
place. The words refer most directly I guess to the 200- 
odd-year-old farmhouse, originally a log cabin of four rooms 
built in 1800. The back rooms: a kitchen, what was called 



the mudroom where we used to put on make-up and two 
additional upstairs bedrooms, were added later in 1860. 
The house stands in a lowland with 100 acres of rolling 
hills around to the back and sides. 

For most of us the place, the experience, the living there 
meant something we can't easily manage to express, though 
1 think you sometimes need to try. Celia Eller is living in 
Boston now, but, like so many of us who spent our college 
summers living at The Farm and working in the Theater, 
she remembers Oak Grove summers with a special feeling: 

"It was like a whole different world. We just gave and 
gave to each other — fixing lunches for 20. cleaning up after 
every night's little or big party, cueing each other, painting 
sets and making costumes — and of course, the plays them- 
selves! Doing all this as friends, together, to make it all 
work." 

And with the years, the Theater Wagon Festival group 
working at The Farm has developed that same closeness 
and cohesion. "There's a total interaction between peo- 
ple, on and off stage. There are no barriers because you 
know each other." This from Lisa Sloan, a '74 graduate of 
Mary Baldwin who has been acting with Theater Wagon 
for three years. 

People caring for each qther in a way that doesn't exclude 
weaknesses and in a way that will accept the intervention 
of years, to go on. despite and because of individual chang- 
ing. Aurelia Crawford, another '74 graduate who acts in 
"A Blank Page Entitled Climax" by Jeannie Lee, expresses 
it this way: "There's very little domination and direction 
and a lot of self-discipline. I just feel I'm accepted." 

Celia Flow Eller '61 




Mary Baldwin in Oak Grove and Theater Wagon 



(AUTHORS. STARS and OTHERWISE) 



1954 — Jeanne Taylor Block, Ida Sumner Wood, Mary Ann Taylor Murray, Liz De Loach, Jan Mitchell 

Harper, Wini Boggs Myrick 
1955— Page Smith Hartley 

1956 — Patty Parke Schneider, Lois Morrison Zeigler 
1957 — Sue Stockton Fletcher, "Mutt" Jamerson Kirk 
1958 — Barbara Allan Hite, Jane Lucke, Daisy Givens Weaver 
1960 — Mary Ellen Brown Lewis, Peggy Creightoti Seldeen 
1961 — Betty Allan Collins, Celia Flow Eller, Mary Blake Green Finnite 
1962 — Mary Eldridge Bowen, Linda Dolly Hammack 

1963 — Suzie Clark Adema, Waverly Rogerson Moss. Martha Grant Rideout, Kathy Sproul Perry 
1964 — Ginny Royster Francisco 

1966 — Glenda Pearson Anderson, Davyne Verstandig De Marco, Robbie Penn Linden 
1967 — Susan Massie. Judy Paulsel, Frances Wise, Carolyn Weekley 
1968 — Janet Childrey Collins, Claudia Bruce Williamson 
1970 — Diane Darnell Hughes, Connie Kittle Neer, Louise Rossett McNamee 

1972 — Carolyn Day, Terry Koogler Southerington, Connie Atkins, Linda Fitzgerald, Jan Triplett 
1973 — Donna Shanklin, Gardner Roller 
1974 — Lisa Sloan, Aurelia Crawford, Custer LaRue 
1975 — Jeannie Lee, Susan Bickerstaff, Debbie Davies 



Really, the truth is. you can come home again and be 
the same or even better than you were. This isn't the kind 
of place built on memories that growth and time should ask 
you to abandon, not the naive and innocent "home" of 
childhood with the sort of protection and idealism better 
left unrevisited, not the summer camp that is truly im- 
practical at any other time of year. 
* * * 

So we are home again. All of us. We ride up the hill to 
the Grove to check in with "The Pond" people. Jeannie 
leans against a tree with one script hanging from her hand, 
another one on the ground. I'd forgotten she was learning 
two parts — one for "The Pond" the next night and one for 
her own play on Sunday — besides directing her play. 
(Jeannie wrote her first play — with folksongs — at the age 
of 15.) Others arrive and I turn around. 

"Bob — hie!" Celia has a big hug for such a tiny frame. 
" When'd you . . .?" 

"Just this minute!" 

"Susan!" Another hug. (Susan Massie is working on a 
master's degree in library science at Emory University and 
I hadn't seen her since last year.) "I didn't know you were 
in 'The Pond'?" 

"Betty Lou. I want to cry for this girl. Oh. she's so 
lovable." 

Susan is not reticent either about her feelings for Theater 
Wagon: "The August Festivals have become a way of life 
for me. They are times when everybody gives on a gut 
level because there are lines to be learned, scenes to be 
rehearsed, sets to be built, children to be tended, and parties 
to be lived. Fletch and Margaret have come as near as 
anybody I know to mastering the art of sharing, and the 
concept of sharing permeates the whole atmosphere — 
sharing art, music, drama, friendships new and old." 



It's true. What Margaret and Fletch have done in the 
theater is, of course, inseparable from what they've done 
with their lives and for all of us. For them, the theater 
exists wherever its audience is, and is of value as it serves 
that audience. Margaret says this in the introduction to 
Plays of Place and Any Place, the collection of some of 
our plays published (with help from Mary Baldwin) by 
the University Press of Virginia last fall: 

"Where community is real, there is communion. Good 
things can happen. People talk to each other. Artists, 
patrons, audiences get together. Some dreams can be 
realized. Community comes alive when it creates new 
forms. Reality is touched with magic. There is zest. There 
is laughter. There is even compassion. The rest is imagi- 
nation." 

Connie Kittle Neer put it this way in a Christmas letter 
to the Collins last year: "I value now more than ever 
what Dr. Collins taught me about theater. In school, BIG 
TIME represented the ultimate (Big Time being New York, 
Broadway, Numbers, and Money). I had Big Time right 
in my own backyard in my association with both of you! 
. . . Big is what you make it. . . ." 

Susan Massie '67 




But we're here at the Grove now — working. I turn 
again. My sister. Bette, and I have seen each other recently; 
our greeting is more subdued. "You fink, you were sup- 
posed to be here yesterday." 

Her role in "The Pond" is the 16th role in the 13th play 
Bette has done for Theater Wagon. (The group has pro- 
duced 30 different plays since 1967, and one play, "Love Is 
a Daisy," has been performed over 40 different times. ) 
Bette is one of the hardest working of the hard-core 
loyalists: 

"I think long ago I realized I didn't have the time to do 
very much in the theater, and Theater Wagon, because it 
does new shows has always seemed to me the most worth- 
while use of that time." 

I find my husband. Rich, and our eldest son finishing a 
scene from "The Pond," and it's time to go back "down 
the hill" for happy hour and supper. 

After dinner (Margaret was serving 60 to 70 people in 
time for an 8 o'clock dress rehearsal ) we all go off in sev- 
eral directions to work. Connie Atkins, for instance, had 
costumes she'd made and brought from Washington to fit 
and adjust on actresses in "The Pond." 

Some of us wash dishes and talk. (Years ago in the 
summers Peggy Creighton Seldeen and I used to wash 
dishes all night because we'd talk so deeply during the 
process.) Water is carried from the pump in the breeze- 
way and dumped in buckets by the sink or in kettles for 
boiling on the stove. You wash, and then rinse with the 
boiling water, and dry. And you talk. Of course, some- 
times when you go to pump water you look out over the 
hills at the cows, at the woods, and sometimes you have to 
stop and wait and talk a bit while the water heats up on 
the stove. Well, it is a slow process, but sometimes I do 
miss it, working alone in my kitchen of conveniences. 

There's music after rehearsals, everyone sitting around 
the log cabin, low-ceilinged living room. Out of every 20 
people in the Theater Wagon group, there'll be ten who 
play the guitar and four or five others who play banjo or 
mandolin or mountain dulcimer. 

Dr. Collins collected ballads in West Virginia and North 
Carolina for the Library of Congress in the late '30's and 
early '40's. These songs were those you didn't learn in 
elementary school or camp or hear on the radio as standard 
popular folk fare, and they came to have their own signif- 
icance in relation to the place. The version Fletch found 
of "The Four Mary's" or "The Two Sisters." "The House 
Carpenter." It's a very fine thing to be singing with peo- 
ple, some of whom you've known for 20 years, a song 
you've sung together for that many years (and what about 
all the people who've sung it before, for hundreds of years 
past?) — changing and unchanging. 

Carolyn Day wrote the Collins recently, "I have missed 
your wonderful parties, seriously!" 

Visitors feel the dynamics of this scene. Linda Dolly 
Hammack says the most vivid memory she had of The 
Farm is the night Dame Judith Anderson came out for a 



party after her performance at MBC in Medea in 1962: 
"I was sitting by the fire and there she was not four feet 
away on the couch. With music there's a closeness re- 
gardless of where you're from or what you're doing at the 
time. We sang for her, with her, for hours, and she kept 
asking for more." 

Surrounded by music, late night sounds, the time after 
rehearsals or shows, the time from 11:30 p.m. on is partly 
this and partly quiet conversation around the long, door- 
length kitchen table. 

Topics range from the nature and purpose of art, and 
theater, of course, to child-rearing and the place of women 
in society. We can all talk for hours, but the talks we share 
with Margaret — these especially have kept me, at least, 
nourished at that table the way no meat could. "I've always 
believed that I could take whatever life throws at me and 
create something good out of it," says Margaret. And by 
that beautiful optimism we all are served. 

Of course, the fact is that she has written some 14 full- 
length plays as well as assorted magazine articles, and 
raised four incredibly diverse sons, and along with her 
husband heads up a successful, unusual, and provincial 
(in the real sense of the word) theater operation. 

Margaret Collins 




Friday we are all scattered. The most confusion, the 
most work and hurrying involves Margaret's play, "The 
Pond," making its premiere in Festival '73. (It has since 
played two nights in Richmond's Stage Center Theater.) 
The play is, at least in part, about commitment and what 
it requires. It was funny: it was serious. 

We are scheduled to perform my play, "Ready or Not" 
on Saturday night and. for us. the whole day is taken up 
with rehearsals and last-minute preparations. The play has 
to do with games — adults and children both "playing" them 
seriously. The acting area is smaller than we'd planned, 
so we make some adjustments, bumping into each other a 
lot in the process. We have to miss brunch in at The Oaks 
and the children's theater workshop during the afternoon 
on the lawn at The Farm. The improvisations with the 
children are very free and spontaneous. Ida Wood describes 
an afternoon with the story of The Golden Goose when 
adults joined children, "none of us being either grown- 
ups or kids." 

As show time approaches my main concern is with our 
boys and the uncertainty of how a real audience will affect 
them. No need to fear; they "steal the show" like ring 
bearers at a wedding. 

Sunday morning at a Theater Wagon member's log cabin 
in Marble Valley, Ginny Royster Francisco serves some 50 
people one of her by now famous brunches. This time — 
crepes — crepes with crab meat sauce, with mushroom 
sauce, or with orange sauce. Another group member plays 
the banjo while we all sit, too heavy to move, looking out 
on the mountains from various porch and deck levels. 

Ginny got her Ph.D. in drama from Indiana University 
and now teaches with Fletch in the drama department at 
MBC. She leans back and explains her commitment to 
Theater Wagon: 

"Well, I get plenty of theater at the college! After all, 
theater is my business now. I should just do that and go 
home like a sensible person. But I do it because of the 
people. It's the music, the talk, the relationships you build 
with people you work with closely and hard." 

Jeannie Lee '75 



When we recover sufficiently to mobilize some 13 or 14 
cars, we make it back into Staunton to the Mirror Room 
at the college to see Celia's group from Boston, Raggedy 
Ann, give their multimedia show called "A Mother and 
Child Reunion." The show deals with traditional and 
changing roles of women as mothers and as children in 
society. Afterward we were all talking at once. 

Meanwhile. Diane Darnell Hughes and her husband, 
Mike, had arrived at The Oaks from Charlottesville with a 
station wagon full of manicotte, salad, garlic bread, cake 
and coffee — enough to serve 100. Loyalty! 

In time for the final theatrical event of the weekend 
we're back in the Oak Grove Theater by 8 p.m. Sunday 
night. In Jeannie's play, "Mushrooms and How They 
Grow," adults are the children; it's the problem of "grow- 
ing up" for all of us, men and women. But that doesn't 
begin to explain the play. Jeannie is attending Mary Bald- 
win now, and Theater Wagon performed one of her plays 
("On the Corner of Cherry and Elsewhere") there last 
year. As the students discovered, Jeannie writes on a 
number of levels — myth, comedy, pathos, poetry, and 
bawdy fun all rolled together. 

Monday morning those of us left who had been sleeping 
in the farmhouse spent too long drinking coffee around that 
kitchen table, not wanting to take the parting step, to ac- 
tually carry suitcases back to the cars, to make that effort 
to leave when it would be so nice to stay. 

At 18, after a summer at The Farm, I used to get all 
teary and depressed when I'd have to leave. Well, when 
you're young, in college, and you've found a beautiful 
place, it's hard to leave because you don't have so much to 
go back to in the rest of your life. I think it's because of 
The Farm — the people and the theater, all of it — that I have 
much to go back to now. And I can leave it more easily 
now — that silly dirt road, those ruts, changing, unchanging. 




About the Authors. . . 

The Allan sisters, Bobbie and Bette, launched their theatri- 
cal careers in Richmond in 1957 and they are still hooked 
on drama. Theater Wagon and Oak Grove are household 
words to Bobbie and Bette. Both made drama their college 
career, both chose husbands who have theatrical talents, 
and both have had billings as star, author and director. 
Bobbie is a part-time English teacher at Virginia Wesleyan 
in Norfolk, where her husband Rick is professor of dramatic 
arts. Bette is the wife of Dr. Christopher Collins, a Char- 
lottesville realtor. 



The Fourth B -Broman 



By Nancy Draper 



Miss Diaper is one of Dr. Broman's former students. After graduating from 
Mary Baldwin in 1951, she went on to earn her Master of Music degree from 
the Eastman School of Music. Miss Draper also studied at the Staatlich Hochshule 
for Music and Theater in Hanover, Germany, and in 1964 was awarded a soloist's 
diploma in piano from this institution. In addition, she has done summer study 
in Colorado and in New York. Presently she is Associate Professor of Music at 
Colby Junior College in New London, New Hampshire. 



Our alma mater made a wise and for- 
tunate choice in appointing Dr. Carl 
W. Broman, a person of unusual capa- 
bilities, as chairman of the music de- 
partment in 1935, upon the retirement 
of Dr. Wilmar Robert Schmidt. 

Throughout its history, the college 
has recognized and encouraged ex- 
cellence in education and the building 
of ideals and character in the indivi- 
dual. These objectives have been ably 
implemented by Dr. Broman through- 
out his 39 years of loyal and dedicated 
service. 

Some musicians excell as perform- 
ers; others excell as educators. Dr. 
Broman is unique in having achieved 
success in both categories. Before leav- 
ing his native Chicago, he won several 
awards and contests, one of which 
resulted in his performing with the 
Chicago Symphony Orchestra. He re- 
ceived a scholarship to attend the 
famed Juilliard School of Music, in the 
piano classes of both Josef and Rosina 
Lhevinne, world-renowned artist-teach- 
ers. With very few exceptions, every 
pianist of importance today has studied 
with Madame Lhevinne, the grande 
dame of piano teachers. "I'm not plan- 
ning to emulate her!" Dr. Broman re- 
marked recently when commenting on 
her teaching career, for she is still ac- 
tive at the age of 94! 

For most performers who receive 
recognition, honors are limited to one 
area of specialty. Here again, Dr. 
Broman is remarkable. He received 
a National Federation of Music Clubs 
award in organ. He conducted the 
Lutheran Bach Society of New York 
for five years, and presented perform- 
ances in Town Hall and various 
churches in New York City. In fact, 
during Dr. Broman's early years at 



Mary Baldwin, he was in charge of 
all the choral work and directed the 
glee club at Hampden-Sydney College 
with numerous performances, includ- 
ing some with the Harvard Orchestra. 

Further honors include member- 
ship in Phi Gamma Delta fraternity 
and in The Pierian Sodality of 1808 
of Harvard University, the oldest ac- 
tive musical organization in America. 
Only seven honorary members had 
been admitted to this organization in 
its long history prior to Dr. Broman's 
election. 

In addition to studies at Juilliard, 
Dr. Broman's educational background 
includes degrees from the University 
of Chicago, the American Conserva- 
tory of Music, Columbia University, 
and an honorary dotorate from Hamp- 
den-Sydney College. Throughout his 
years in Staunton, he has become well 
known for his achievements as pianist, 
organist, and conductor. Even when 
his teaching career was interrupted for 
three years of service with the U. S. 
Army, Captain Broman, as Special 
Services officer at Camp Shanks, N.Y., 
utilized his talents in arranging out- 
standing musical performances for the 
troops about to embark overseas. 

As a musician. Dr. Broman's qualif- 
ications and experiences are notable. 
Equally impressive is his versatility in 
the field of education. It is rare to 
find a teacher who is successful in so 
many areas — instrumental and choral 
music, literature, theory, and composi- 
tion. I recall, from my student days 
at Mary Baldwin, that we music majors 
spoke of the four B's memorable as 
musicians: Bach, Beethoven, Brahms, 
and Broman. 

But knowledge and educational 
background and experience alone do 



not make the great teacher. What is 
it, then, that has won Dr. Broman 
such high esteem throughout the years 
among so many people, colleagues as 
well as students? Much of it has to do 
with traits of personality and character. 
1 have never known a person more 
dedicated to his art and profession. 
He loves to teach — to train and develop 
the skills, minds, and character of his 
students. In his wisdom. Dr. Broman 
guides with the utmost patience, under- 
standing, kindness, and compassion, 
using his gift for discerning the 
strengths and weaknesses of each indi- 
vidual. College students of all genera- 
tions have sought to know themselves 
better, to learn to recognize and come 
to terms with their own identities; Dr. 
Broman has helped many to achieve 
this goal. 

He has fond memories of graduates 
whom he has taught in past years; yet 
he says of today's students, "I think 
this is a very good generation." The 
numbers of alumnae who have studied 
with him and successfully completed 
graduate training at some of the lead- 
ing universities in this country and 
abroad attest to his success as an edu- 
cator. However, his influence is by no 
means limited to those who have pur- 
sued careers in music. I know other 
students whose lives have been deeply 
touched by the stimulus and inspira- 
tion that he has provided. For all, the 
dedicatory inscription for the Blue- 
stocking of 1958 still holds true: "He 
is an unselfish musician who has not 
hidden his light under a bushel, but 
who has used his talent as an imple- 
meiii with which to guide us in our 
search for the beautiful." 

Dr. Broman was never too busy to 
help a deserving student, a remarkable 
trait when one considers his heavy 
teaching schedule and other college- 
community activities. He was a true 
friend and counselor, an excellent 
faculty adviser who took a sincere in- 
terest in his students. He encouraged 
or criticized as deserved. Undoubted- 
ly this had much to do with the trust 
and confidence placed upon his judg- 
ment. 




Dr. Broman's vitality as an educator 
never waned. He was constantly read- 
ing, attending workshops, and partici- 
pating actively in leading musical or- 
ganizations throughout the country. 
In addition, he served as organist and 
choirmaster at Trinity Episcopal 
Church in Staunton, chairman of the 
Music Commission for the Episcopal 
Diocese of Southwestern Virginia, and 
chairman of the board of the King 
Series. 

Dr. Broman's expectations are high 
and there are times when his students 
must work very hard, but there are 
also times when his sense of humor 
lightens the day. Then too, there are 
times of much fun, enhanced by his 
good judgment in the choice of a wife! 
Countless students over the years have 
remarked about the loveable warmth 
of personality of Mrs. Broman, her 
charm and her gracious hospitality. 
What good times we have enjoyed in 
their home for receptions and dinner 
parties! 

The Broman children have likewise 
succeeded in careers where importance 
of the individual is stressed. Mary, 
employed as instructor of French and 
resident counselor at Mary Baldwin 
the year following her graduation, is 
now vocational evaluator at the Wood- 
row Wilson Rehabilitation Center. 
John is executive director of Tinker 
Mountain Workshop, a rehabilitation 
facility in Botetourt County, Virginia. 

Dr. Broman says that his retire- 
ment plans are still indefinite. He con- 
tinually thinks of projects that seem 
exciting. Now that he has time to 
devote to new, worthwhile endeavors, 
there is no doubt that he will find new, 
rewarding experiences. 

It is the Dr. Bromans of this world 
who create and maintain the atmos- 
phere of understanding and learning 
that is Mary Baldwin. 



Vega, story of joie de vivre 




Their roadside mail box says "Carr-Lylton," testimony of the long-standing associ- 
ation of two of Mary Baldwin's outstanding loyalists, one serving food to the body. 
the other filling the appetite of the mind, those inseparable needs of college 
students. It was appropriate, therefore, that Betty Carr, now in her 32nd year as 
food service director and seldom called upon to exercise her literary talents 
beyond monthly menus, should write this "story" of Vega Lytton. — Editor 



By B. C. 

Being asked to write a tribute to any- 
one who is held in high esteem is quite 
an honor, but when I was asked to 
write one to my close personal friend, 
Vega Lytton, I was at once over- 
whelmed as to where to begin. 

How does one pay tribute to a bright 
star of such magnitude! (I didn't 
know 29 years ago that Vega is the 
bright star of the first magnitude in the 
summer constellation of Lyra, which 
was the favorite star of Vega's father, 
Dr. D. W. Morehouse, astronomer and 
college president. And just think of 
the many thar think Vega is the name 
of a compact car!) 

I recall when Elizabeth Parker asked 
me to welcome the new Assistant Dean 
of Students and French professor and 
her daughter, who were driving from 
Iowa, to arrive at a time when Eliza- 
beth had another commitment. I re- 
call that I wondered, "Where on earth 
is Iowa," and after looking on a map 
I wondered how many miles it must be 
from Des Moines to Staunton, Vir- 
ginia! I thought I was doing pretty 
good to be 300 miles from my home; 
and the Lyttons were driving 1,300! 

So, before I ever met Vega, I 
thought of the tremendous courage it 
must have taken to leave family and 
true friends to come to new and differ- 
ent surroundings in such a "foreign" 
part of the country; and taking a "teen- 
ager" away from her friends — I just 
couldn't imagine how anyone could 
doit. 



The loss of her father, who was 
president of Drake University, and 
then just three weeks later, the un- 
timely death of her husband, who was 
business manager of Drake, surely 
was more than an overwhelming blow. 
As heavy time passed slowly, Vega 
thought it might help to get away com- 
pletely from that university community 
which held so very many happy mem- 
ories. 

And now, after having known Vega 
for 29 years, and having experienced 
the great joy of sharing "living-quar- 
ters" with her for 18 of those years, I 
can say unequivocally that she is in- 
deed the most courageous person I've 
ever known. 

During Vega's first week on cam- 
pus. Dr. Jarman suddenly became seri- 
ously ill and Elizabeth Parker received 
word of the critical illness of her 
mother in Chattanooga. Here was this 
new Assistant Dean who didn't even 
know where she and her daughter 
were to live, let alone anything else, 
and suddenly she had to take full 
charge of student affairs. 

I walked into the Dean's office one 
Sunday afternoon just in time to hear 
Vega trying to explain to a very promi- 
nent townsperson why Mary Baldwin 
students couldn't play tennis on Sun- 
day! She didn't know why, other than 
it was a rule in the "Handbook," and 
all she could do was to repeat over and 
over exactly what the Handbook said! 
Even in those "long-gone square times" 
it was really an hysterical conversa- 
tion for one eavesdropping. 



I couldn't help with the "tennis 
deal," but I was able to explain a few 
"incidental" points about the "strange" 
food of the South as opposed to that 
of the Midwest. Vega had always 
eaten rice with sugar and a little milk 
or butter — but never with chicken 
gravy! I've been able to convince her 
that the Sunday custom of "tar-heel 
chicken with rice and gravy" is not 
too hard to take! My first visit to 
Iowa was at the height of the corn 
season, and no wonder she was some- 
what puzzled the first time she ate 
Florida corn in Virginia. Vive la dif- 
ference! 

When you are sincerely and deeply 
devoted to your chosen profession, the 
end product is a rewarding experience. 
Vega's love for the French language 
began when she was in high school. 
She knew then she wanted to teach 
that beautiful language. Her major 
professor at Drake University was the 
brilliant Dr. Jean Pierre Le Coq, and 
indeed in teaching his native language, 
he inspired Vega to become an ex- 
cellent and dedicated French teacher. 
She later studied at the Alliance 
Francaise and the Sorbonne, and spent 
many summers at Middlebury. 



10 




As a teacher, no matter what her 
schedule was, she always wanted to 
spend extra time with any of her stu- 
dents who desired a little more help 
on subjunctive or anything else they 
didn't understand. Her patience and 
understanding had its rewards when 
she read "smiley" little notes at the 
end of an examination paper, telling 
her she had made the French language 
come alive. 

This kind of success, which never 
ceases to amaze her, is best expressed 
by one of her colleagues in the French 
Department: "Anyone who can keep 
all of her intermediate French students 
after the language requirement is drop- 
ped has to be a great teacher, and 
great teachers are hard to come by." 
Humility is a very strong attribute, and 
I can say without reservation that this 
lady has a depth of so great a virtue. 
Shortly after the MacFarland Lan- 
guage Laboratory was installed she 
became director and with her own 
versatility responded to the technologi- 
cal advances in teaching. 

"Your friend is your needs ans- 
wered: He is your field which you sow 
with love and reap with thanksgiving" 
— so speaks Gibran, and indeed my 
needs have more than been answered 
by her giving of herself in times of 
sickness, sorrow and joy. This friend 
has a deep reservoir of inner strength 
which she gives in abundance at the 
slightest tap. Her concern is first and 
always for the other person, never for 
herself; and she is one of those rare 
individuals who thinks to find only 
good in people — a strong Morehouse 
trait! 

As Vega "technically" closes the 
French book and will no longer battle 
writing "redskin French" sentences, 
she looks forward to spending more 
time with her family in Iowa and Cali- 
fornia, and to seeing close college 
friends she has not seen in years. Then, 
too, France and the Alps of Switzer- 
land are calling loud and clear! And 
before too much longer, we're hoping 
that I, too, can put the "menu planner" 
aside to join her in her great "Joie de 
Vivre." 



11 



Back When Cokes Were A Nickel . . . 



By Jann Mai one. '72 

Back when Cokes were a nickel and women wore 
shoulder pads in their dresses, it didn't cost much to go 
to college. 

There were tuition and room and board to pay and new 
clothes to buy. If a student went away to school, there was 
a bus or train ticket. 

And there were a few extras: an occasional weekend 
at a neighboring college, a movie or a meal away from the 
dining hall. 

Today, college costs a lot more. Inflation makes those 
same expenses more expensive, and there are new ways for 
students to spend their money. 

Today's students own cars, television sets and stereos. 
They travel beyond neighboring colleges and they stay in 
motels. Some have telephones and refrigerators in their 
rooms. 

According to a yellowing ledger, it cost $5,719 to send a 
student in the Class of '43 through four years at Mary 
Baldwin College. Today a student easily could spend that 
much there in a year. 

Mary Baldwin is representative of the private, women's 
liberal arts colleges in Virginia. Expenses at all of them 
are about the same. Expenses at public institutions are less, 
but they have also increased proportionately over the years. 

The $5,719 figure covered all college-related expenses 
from September 1939 to June 1943, including clothing and 
transportation to and from the student's home in St. Louis. 

Three current Mary Baldwin juniors from Georgia, New 
Jersey and Virginia estimated their expenses at the college. 
The Georgia student, who receives no financial aid, spends 
about $5,500 a year. The New Jersey and Virginia students, 
both on financial aid, each spend between $3,000 and 
$4,000 a year. 

Tuition, room and board was $800 a year in 1939-1943. 
Today, students pay $3,949.50. [Next year they will pay 
$4,167.00.] There is no guarantee that tuition will not 
increase each year. It has gone up $1,000 in five years. 

The $3,949.50 includes insurance, linen rental, labora- 
tory fees, student activities fees and practice teaching fees. 
The $800 did not. 

There are extras at Mary Baldwin today. Three hours 
of riding lessons each week will cost a student $560. Organ, 
piano or voice lessons cost $ 1 50. 

To help defray expenses, many students today at private 
Virginia colleges receive large chunks of financial aid. At 
Mary Baldwin the average stipend is $1,350. 

Today's students share some of the same expenses as 
their 1940's counterparts. But inflation has raised the price. 

The St. Louis student rode the train to Staunton in 
September 1942 for $33.97. She had a first-class Pullman 
berth. Today it is impossible to ride a train from St. Louis 
to Staunton. The train goes to Washington, so a student 
must find her own way to Staunton. A coach seat from 
St. Louis to Washington costs $40.50. 



Today's student could fly from the airport in Weyers 
Cave to Washington and make a St. Louis connection that 
would cost $78.27 for coach. 

Clothes are now more expensive. The St. Louis student 
bought two dresses in 1942 for $23.15. The Virginia stu- 
dent recently spent $56 for two pairs of slacks, a nightgown 
and some underwear. The last dress the Georgia student 
bought cost $100. 

Today, books cost anywhere from $50 to $100 a 
semester. The Virginia student spent $90.06 on books last 
fall. Book expenses for 1939-1943 averaged $12 a semester. 

Allowances are much larger now. The Georgia student 
receives $150 a month. The other two. both on financial 
aid, have open allowances: they ask their parents for 
money when they need it. They estimate their expenses 
run between $50 and $100 a month. The student in the 
Class of '43 got a $15 allowance each month for four years. 

Today's student has expenses the Class of '43 never 
thought about. A student who owns a car pays not only 
for gasoline and maintenance but also for the right to park 
it at Mary Baldwin ($25). 

For another $25, a student can have her television set 
hooked up to Staunton's cable television. She can rent a 
small refrigerator for $23 or have a telephone installed in 
her room for $12. 

People who remember the '40's and who know Mary 
Baldwin now say that the one big difference is the car. 
Owning a car is expensive, but it gives the student a mobility 
she didn't have in 1940. She can roam a wider range for 
dates. She is not confined to downtown Staunton for food 
or entertainment. 

Inflation is also a factor, but Mary Baldwin observers 
say students have a different attitude about spending today. 
They are freer with their money; they have overcome the 
reluctance to spend that students in the 1940's had to cope 
with. 

And the Class of '43 had an expense that today's student 
never thinks about and probably would refuse to pay. 
When a student had a date in the '40's and spent the 
weekend in Charlottesville or Lexington, she had a chape- 
rone and had to pay her expenses. 



Reprinted with permission from the Richmond Times-Dis- 
patch, November 4, 1973. 

Jann, a Phi Beta Kappa math major, has been with the Rich- 
mond, Virginia, newspaper since her graduation. She is the 
daughter of Ralph and Jane (A bbott) Malone, of New Orleans. 



12 




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Staunton, Virginia 24401